Got Sleep? 5 Ways to Doze Better and Feel More Energized

By Sun Jung  •  July 26, 2014

As we grow older, our circadian rhythm becomes more vulnerable to our habits and surroundings. Because a goodnight rest dictates how our day is going to be, we need to fix our routines and menus to get the most out of our sleeping period. To those who are struggling with insomnia or simply want to maximize their bedtime period, here are five ways to sleep better and feel more energized.

 

Ways to Sleep Better


Do not frequent the gym at night. Experts agree that it is better to avoid working out at least two hours before your sleeping time. Consider switching your workout time in the morning or evening. Right after your workout, you body’s metabolism is active; therefore, you will feel a little bit hyper than usual. It is better to feel that way in the morning when you’re starting the day than at night when you’re getting ready for bed. Go to sleep early and wake up early to hit the gym instead of delaying it to late hours. Plus, you want to sparkle up that metabolism during the daytime when you’ll be eating meals.

 

 

When it’s bedtime, get rid of anything that has a screen on it. Mitigate the nocturnal dose of television by taking the TV out of the bedroom. Having an enormous screen right in front of the bed only tempts you to stay up late. Same goes for smaller screens. Several of my friends in college made the mistake of lying in bed with their cell phones, hence missing morning lectures. Put those electronics away because you will be up until 4am chatting to your friends or trying to scroll down to the limit of tumblr (answer: the limit does not exist). To those of you who need mini activities before hitting dreamland, read Darwin’s On the Origins of Species. It is a carefully crafted masterpiece that delivers the right amount of coma-inducing monotone.

Lower your caffeine intake. Try not to drink coffee or tea for at least six hours before bedtime. Replace it with other healthier and sugar-free beverages like mineral water and decaf tea. If you are one of those hopeless people who have replaced coffee for water, then let’s seek help together. During the summer, I have managed to reduce my coffee from three cups a day to one cup. Instead of depriving myself of my Starbucks abruptly, I gradually replaced it with other alternatives that were refreshing and helped me kill my coffee habitué slowly. For the first week, you might feel slightly edgy, but your body will get used it and it’s worth it.

 

 

Cut back on snacks. Instead of indulging in high fatty snacks, cut them back and substitute them with healthier alternatives like almonds and dark chocolate. Dessert lovers need to skip that cheesecake after dinner because the sugar can induce unwanted jumpiness. To be on the safe side, brush your teeth immediately following a light dinner. As we get older, we need to accept that our sleep sensitivity gets more prone to what we eat. Also, avoid fruits at night. Despite the fact that they do fall on the healthy category of snacks, they are high in sugar.

Instead of taking sleeping pills, opt for taking an all-natural sleeping aid. One example, Amrion’s Rest Fully Sleep Supplement is comprised of a mixture of seven nutrients that help you to fall into a deep sleep at night. With an ideal amount of melatonin and valerian, you will wake up grogginess-free and feeling renewed. Due to the fear of dependency, people tend to avoid taking any medications or substances that help them fall asleep. But what makes Amrion different from other is that it contains non-addictive elements. By taking one to three capsules at night, you’ll fall asleep shortly

Benjamin Franklin said, “There will be plenty of time to sleep once you are dead.” That quote makes sense if you are a 17-year-old kid named Randy Gardner who was determined to break the world record of remaining awake for 264.4 hours. But to those who are past that golden hormonal age, fixing habits can dramatically improve the brief precious resting periods of your lives.   



Sun Jung Sun Jung Sun Jung is currently an undergraduate student at the University of Southern California majoring in English Literature. Born in South Korea, she was raised in Guadalajara, Mexico for seventeen years before coming to LA for college.


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