Sell Your Apple Gadgets Before They Depreciate in October

By Sun Jung  •  July 10, 2014

Post-Fourth of July marks the invasion of back-to-school specials into my student e-mail account. Lately, Apple has been cajoling me to upgrade my second generation iPad by waving their $100 Apple Store Gift Card deal when I buy a new iPad for college. Although I knew that my tablet and laptop were going to be devaluated in the fall with Apple’s new release of computers and tablets, I ignored the warnings. It wasn’t until last night when the 1.33lb square dropped right on my nose as I fell asleep reading that I finally got a revelation. When fall comes, the price-blow of my tablet will hurt more than the one I got last night. For tech lovers who are planning to purchase the latest products in the fall, sell your old devices now through the following means before new ones depreciate everything further.

To those of you looking to sell your Apple tablets, phones, laptops, or iPods quickly, Apple Store is your best option. Not many people know this, but Apple has its own Reuse and Recycle Program in partnership with PowerON Services, Inc. By indicating the model and condition of your device, the program will calculate and offer you a price based on the information given. The free shipping label also comes with free packaging at your nearest FedEx location. So save that boxing-taping drama. You may think that selling back to the store that you bought it from is a bad idea, but it’s not in the case of Apple. From my research, Apple offered the best price for my iPad—$150. Note that Apple pays you with gift card, so if you want real-world currency consider the following options.

The next best option for Apple users as well as other device owners is Glyde – a platform where you can sell your games, Mac products, Androids, and more. Unlike the Reuse and Recycle Program, you can adjust the price of the product and sell it to other users. For my iPad, the site recommended me to sell it at $160 from which I would gain back a profit of $144.30. If you have the patience to wait a few days or weeks to sell your gadgets, then Glyde it! You don’t need to upload any photos or descriptions, simply list the item on sale and get the pre-paid shipping label once someone decides to buy it. Glyde will pay you in cash. Also if you happen to get tired of your Xbox One’s Call of Duty or Samsung Galaxy, you can convert them into cash through here. People visit Glyde to even buy broken phones, DVDs, and cameras. Get those techie bargainers, because they are out there.

 

 

No time to Glyde? Then go for NextWorth. The site offers cash for most electronics including first generation iPads, smartphones, Samsung tablets, laptops, and video games. For Kindle owners in need of an upgrade, NextWorth also buys back your Kindle. Get a quote, ship it via UPS for free, and get your money in the form of a Discover prepaid card, gift card, check, PayPal, or Target gift card. While NextWorth offered me $108 for my iPad, it would have been my option if I needed real cash and sell it fast.

Similar to Glyde, uSell also allows you to sell your gadgets and adjust the price. So, how is this different from Glyde? Their recommended price for selling may be lower in comparison, but if you are looking to sell outdated devices (i.e. camera-less phones) uSell is the best place to set up a nice shop. Think of it as the tech-vintage corner of the online marketplace where the aficionados for old machines come to shop. You can even sell textbooks at uSell. For my iPad, I got a $104 offer in cash. I know it’s not as high as Apple’s $150 offer, but the payment in cash and comes with free shipping.

 

 

In the past month, Apple has cut down their prices on laptops and iPads by $100 or more. Cyber oracles have been prophesying the upcoming of new computers and tablets for the fall. Although opinions may vary, many anticipate an official announcement by September. Make the most out of your depreciating gadgets by 1) selling it and taking advantage of student deals or 2) selling it and wait for the new models.

As tech-geek Benjamin Franklin said, “Time is money.” This holds truer now than it did in the 1700s.



Sun Jung Sun Jung Sun Jung is currently an undergraduate student at the University of Southern California majoring in English Literature. Born in South Korea, she was raised in Guadalajara, Mexico for seventeen years before coming to LA for college.


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