Best Genealogy Websites to Trace Your Origins

By Sun Jung  •  June 25, 2014

The axiom “know where you come from” still holds true. Looking at one’s family tree can teach more than one’s ethnical components and brush aside any annoying confusion on your identity. If you’ve been told that your ancestor was a vaguely Hispanic-looking man who claimed to be Italian but may or may not have emigrated from Japan, you might as well be called Mario. Or Mario III. See what I’m saying?

Learning about your origins gives a new insight about yourself and clarifies any fuzziness that lies on your racial roots. Perhaps you obtained the musical gene from your great great granny or your last name actually derives from an African region instead of Europe. Some people research their bloodlines as leisure while others do it to find distant relatives and preserve family history. Whatever the intention is, it is crucial to know your past history since a part of you is influenced by it. While spending a fortune on hiring detectives and geneticists is foolish (and would make your ancestors roll on their graves), you can still get reliable results from affordable online services that helps you to put the historical puzzles together. Here are the best genealogy websites to discover more about yourself.

 

Best Genealogy Websites

Entrust your genealogy to 23andMe, which uses the latest technology to break down the DNA percentages that make up your persona. You do not have to show up to a lab in person or give a blood sample – deciphering the family code shouldn’t be painful. Just order your own DNA kit, provide a saliva sample, and send it back in the pre-paid packaging. Once your DNA sample arrives, a team of experts will run tests that reveal what percent of your blood comes from Asia, Africa, Europe, and so on. See where that coupon gene telling you to take 20% off on DNA kits came from with 23andMe.

 

 

Instead of hitting libraries, museums and government archives, register with ancestry.com to access the largest database of American historical records online. The online platform will build your own family tree that indicates where you came from and with whom you may be related. Depending on how deep you want to dig into the past, you can trace your antecedents’ footprints within the nation or go global. Who knows, maybe your great great grandpa was a long-distance cousin of Bonnie or Clyde. Perhaps your dad’s side got the short end of the stick during the Salem Witch Trials and that’s why you deserve to participate in the free 14-day trial.

 

 

Another hotbed to take advantage of the booming field of genetics is Ancestry by DNA. They have a range of services where you can specifically request to obtain your maternal lineage, paternal lineage, and population origins. All of their testing is performed in the same facility where forensic and immigration testing takes place – so you can definitely count on a group of scientists. Make sure to pay the DNA (Deals Not Absolute) price by taking 50% off whatever service you choose.

 

 

There is always that one parent who attributes our idiosyncrasies to the environment and brownie-points behavior to him or her. Connect My DNA solves that issue by combining a DNA test with a personality test to identify people who are like you. Are you addicted to sweet potato fries? Could be that you have a genetic affinity to it. Do you often find yourself unable to work without a company? There may be a group of people that shares the same social gene with you, too. Find how much your genetic composition shapes your personality and show it to that parent…who will most likely start blaming the other one.

We are all naturally inclined to be curious, but nurturally obliged to keep our wallets closed. Choose the right service where nature and nurture harmoniously meet to unlock the past.



Sun Jung Sun Jung Sun Jung is currently an undergraduate student at the University of Southern California majoring in English Literature. Born in South Korea, she was raised in Guadalajara, Mexico for seventeen years before coming to LA for college.


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